Toddler: Rhyming Words and Have You Seen My New Blue Socks?

Toddler storytime is full of little ones these days. The caregivers are hungry for tips and are so enthusiastic. The kiddos are moving to the rhythm, clapping, signing, pointing to the book illustrations, touching the felt pieces and just generally getting into storytime. What a blast!

Weekly Early Literacy Tip: Singing nursery rhymes or other songs is fun and fosters early literacy! We usually sing slower than we speak and as we sing kids can more easily hear the individual sounds in words. This is called phonological awareness and will eventually help your child sound out words when they are ready to read. often the ending sounds are the easiest to hear, so we’re focusing on rhymes today.

Welcome Song: The More We Get (Read) Together (with ASL)

I brought along my monkey puppet to sing with us on this next song. This crowd LOVES puppets.

Action Rhyme: Monkey See Monkey Do
Monkey see, monkey do
Little monkey in the zoo
Monkey, monkey, in the tree
Can you jump around like me?
(…clap your hands…climb a tree…nod your head…sit down…)

Have You Seen My New Blue Socks book image

Have You Seen My New Blue Socks by Eve Bunting and Sergio Ruzzier (Photo source: ruzzier.com)

Book: Have You Seen My New Blue Socks? by Eve Bunting & Sergio Ruzzier (Clarion Books, 2013)

Bunting’s book reads well as a story, unlike some rhyming stories that seem forced. The amount of text, story line and word choice create a pacing, when read aloud, that encourages emphasis on the rhyming words and offers opportunities for the youngest storytime kids to interact with the illustrations and make connections with the text. One on one sharing allows for even more conversation, reinforcing the value of this title as a repeat read.

 Felt game: Little Fox, Little Fox
This felt game was inspired by erinisinire. Lots of people have versions of this game (and it’s cousin Little Mouse, Little Mouse) as Jbrary found out, but I do love this fox the best and it ties nicely with the book we shared this week which includes a fox and some boxes. I used my Folkmanis fox puppet (called Big Fox in this game instead of mom or dad fox) to add another dimension and reinforce the concept of big and small.

Some of the toddlers wanted to hide the fox as well as find it which worked out great because the hiders still let us say the rhyme and were surprised when we found it behind one of the different colored boxes!

Bubbles!
Before we sang this song and popped bubbles together, I mentioned why I count starting with my thumb. We count to three a lot during this storytime to show how easy it is to integrate counting (math) into daily activities and I always start with my thumb. These first three fingers are essential for pinching and grasping small objects and will later be used to hold a paintbrush or writing tool.

Bringing out a box of scarves after I put the bubbles away is a great transition! Before our next song which used different colored scarves, I explained and demonstrated what we were going to do with our scarves and then we sang together. For example we were going to wave the scarves overhead and then rub our hair.

Scarf Song: Scarves in the Air
Put your scarf in the air, in the air
Put your scarf in the air, in the air
Put your scarf in the air, now rub your hair
Put your scarf in the air, in the air
…on your knee, count to three
…on your toe, way to go!
…on your head, who has red? (the families with a red scarf waved it in the air)
Source: Read, Sing, Play
See and hear the tune in action with KCLS

Action Song: If You’re Happy and You Know It
If you’re happy and you know it, wave your scarf.
If you’re happy and you know it, wave your scarf.
If you’re happy and you know it and you really want to show it.
If you’re happy and you know it, wave your scarf.

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands.
If you’re happy and you know it, shout “hooray!”
If you’re happy and you know it, do all three.
(wave, wave, clap, clap, hooray!)

Time to clean up our scarves! I usually have a bag to put the scarves in, but today I brought a box so we could sing this song!

Song: Picking up scarves
Pickin’ up scarves and put them in the box
Pickin’ up scarves and put them in the box
Pickin’ up scarves and put them in the box
Put the scarves in the box
Source: KCLS

Closing Song: Ring Around the Rosie

Activity: Dot painting!
Today I brought out the paint dobbers and some plain white paper for toddlers to try. For some kids, it’s their first experience painting. For all of the kids and adults, it offers a great opportunity to experiment with and talk about colors and patterns.

Toddler: Under the Deep Blue Sea

Welcome Song: Hello Everybody
(clap hands on lap and then together, clap twice on the word “you”)
Hello everybody, how are you?
Hello everybody, how are you?
It’s such a lovely day, I’m so glad you came to play,
Hello everybody, how are you?

Toddler Yoga: Tall as a Tree
Tall as a tree (Stretch arms overhead)
Wide as a house (Stretch arms out to side)
Thin as a pin (Arms tight against side)
Small as a mouse (Crouch small)
(Repeat)

Action Song: If You’re Ready for a Story
(Tune: If You’re Happy and You Know It)
If you’re ready for a story, clap your hands!
If you’re ready for a story, clap your hands!
If you’re ready for a story,
If you’re ready for a story,
If you’re ready for a story, clap your hands!
… sit down please

Feltboard Story: Under the Deep Blue Sea
See the preschool storytime Sharks Under the Sea for details.

Song: Five Little Fishes Swimming in the Sea (with shark puppet and felt fish)
Five little fishes
Swimming in the sea
Teasing Mr. Shark,
You can’t catch me
Oh, you can’t catch me!
Along comes Mr. Shark
As quiet as can be…
SNAP!
Four little fishes
Swimming in the sea…

Movement: Bubbles
One little, two little, three little bubbles.
Four little, five little, six little bubbles.
Seven little, eight little, nine little bubbles.
Ten little bubbles go pop, pop, pop!

Action Chant: I like to…
I like to pop, I like to pop, I like to pop, pop bubbles.
I like to pop, I like to pop, I like to pop, pop bubbles.
I like to pop, I like to pop, I like to pop, pop bubbles.
(stomp, clap, blow…)

Action Song: Baby shark Doo-doo, doo-doo-doo-doo
Baby shark Doo-doo, doo-doo-doo, Baby shark Doo-doo, doo-doo-doo
Mama shark Doo-doo, doo-doo-doo Mama shark Doo-doo, doo-doo-doo
Daddy shark. . . .
Grandpa shark. . .
Shark’s a comin’. . .
Swam away. . .
Made it to shore…
That’s the end

After I used this song in storytime, I discovered Lisa Murphy’s (aka the Ooey Gooey Lady) rendition which is AWESOME! Watch it, learn it, sing it!

Action Song: If You’re Happy and You Know It
If you’re happy and you know it,
rub your tummy.
If you’re happy and you know it, rub your tummy.
If you’re happy and you know it,
Then your face will surely show it.
It you’re happy and you know it,
rub your tummy.
(…wiggle your wrists)
(…spin around)

Goodbye Song: Wave Hi, Wave Low
I think it’s time, we’ve gotta go
Wave your elbows, wave your toes
Wave your tongue, wave your nose
Wave your knees, wave your lips
Blow me a kiss with your fingertips
Wave your chin, wave one eye
Wave a hand and say “goodbye!”

Early Literacy Tip:
Remember to share nonfiction, factual books with your children. Follow their interests: a particular animal, how things work, machines, or anything that piques their curiosity. Information in nonfiction books introduces new vocabulary words and we learn right along with our children. Encouraging their curiosity encourages a love of learning. (modified from : The Early Literacy Kit: A Handbook and Tip Cards by Betsy Diament-Cohen and Saroj Nadkarni Ghoting, 2010)

Toddler: Sheep

Welcome Song: Hello, Everybody
(clap hands on lap and then together, clap twice on the word “you”)
Hello everybody, how are you?
Hello everybody, how are you?
It’s such a lovely day, I’m so glad you came to play,
Hello everybody, how are you?

Time for a toddler yoga!

Tall as a Tree
Tall as a tree (Stretch arms overhead)
Wide as a house (Stretch arms out to side)
Thin as a pin (Arms tight against side)
Small as a mouse (Crouch small)
repeat
Credit: Annapolis Valley Regional Library’s Storytime site

If You’re Ready for a Story

If you’re ready for a story, baa like a sheep!
If you’re ready for a story, baa like a sheep!
If you’re ready for a story, If you’re ready for a story,
If you’re ready for a story, baa like a sheep!
(clap your hands)

Book: Russell the Sheep by Scotton (Harper Collins, 2011)

russell the sheep

With economical use of text, whimsical illustrations, and a lovable sheep, kids can relate to Russell’s trouble- finding sleep. Russell tries everything to bring sleep long after the rest of his flock has drifted off to dreamland. The toddlers quickly warmed to Russell and were anxious to see how he solved his problem. Counting sheep just might do the trick… (we even counted sheep together to see if that would help Russell.)

Bubbles

Action Chant: I Like to…
I like to pop, I like to pop, I like to pop, pop bubbles.
I like to pop, I like to pop, I like to pop, pop bubbles.
I like to pop, I like to pop, I like to pop, pop bubbles.
(stomp, clap, blow)

Old MacDonald (with farm puppets)
Old MacDonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O.
And on that farm he had a cow, E-I-E-I-O.
With a moo moo here and a moo moo there,
Here a moo, there a moo, everywhere a moo moo.
Old MacDonald had a farm, E-I-E-I-O.
(chicken, pig, sheep, dog)

Alphabet Song
(tune: Mary Had a Little Lamb)

If You’re Happy and You Know It
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands,
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands,
If you’re happy and you know it, then your face will surely show it,
If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands,
(wiggle your knees, shake your hips, do all three)

Wave HI, Wave Low
I think it’s time, we’ve gotta go
Wave your elbows, wave your toes
Wave your tongue, wave your nose
Wave your knees, wave your lips
Blow me a kiss with your fingertips
Wave your chin, wave one eye
Wave a hand and say “goodbye!”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Early Literacy Tip: Some nursery rhymes help children develop narrative skills. Those skills will later help them understand what they read. Giving children aids, like flannelboard pieces, puppets, or cut out images, helps them remember the sequence of a story and makes it easier for them to retell the story in the correct order. (from The Early Literacy Kit: A Handbook and Tip Cards, Diamant-Cohen & Nadkarni Ghoting, 2010)

feltboard-icon-lrg
Appvisory: Looking for a fun, open-ended app to help children tell stories? Try Software Smoothie’s digital Feltboard ($2.99) or Feltboard-Mother Goose on the Loose (Free). Both apps are available for iOS.

Photo Credit:
Rob Scotton
kdla.ky.gov

Toddler: Patterns, The Red Hen, and Drumming

Welcome Song: Hello Everybody
(clap hands on lap and then together, clap twice on the word “you”)
Hello everybody, how are you?
Hello everybody, how are you?
It’s such a lovely day, I’m so glad you came to play,
Hello everybody, how are you?

Toddler Yoga: Tall as a Tree
Tall as a tree (Stretch arms overhead)
Wide as a house (Stretch arms out to side)
Thin as a pin (Arms tight against side)
Small as a mouse (Crouch small)
(Repeat)

Song: If You’re Ready for a Story
(Tune: If You’re Happy and You Know It)
If you’re ready for a story, tap your head!
If you’re ready for a story, tap your head!
If you’re ready for a story,
If you’re ready for a story,
If you’re ready for a story, tap your head!
… sit down please

The-REd-HenBook: The Red Hen by Rebecca and Ed Emberley (Macmillan, 2010)
This is a fabulous read aloud for toddlers!
I chose this book for a couple of reasons. I really like this version of the old story which has the red hen enjoying the cake on her own after no one would help her prepare it. I think the hen gets walked on in some of the other versions. While I encourage kids to charitable and giving, I like to inspire confidence and pride as well as sharing in storytime environment. The other reason I love this version is because the illustrations are out of this world. They are bright and very eye catching. Emberley also makes sure to move the red hen and the other animals around on the page even if the scene is familiar, keeping the story fresh for even the youngest readers. I asked kids to help me find the red hen on each page, encouraging them to see the pages of the story in a different way. They loved the game, the repeated text, and the red hen’s response to her unhelpful neighbors.

Movement: Bubbles
One little, two little, three little bubbles.
Four little, five little, six little bubbles.
Seven little, eight little, nine little bubbles.
Ten little bubbles go pop, pop, pop!

We spent the rest of storytime playing with balls which we used as drums. I asked parents to help kids keep them on the floor (no throwing) so we could use balls in a new way. This worked marginally well. To help decrease the chaos, I didn’t blow up the small beach balls I used so they didn’t fly as far. Heather Smith of the Elanco Library posted these songs on the ALSC listserv. Here are the songs we used:

Chant: Dum Ditty (spoken)
Dum-ditty, dum-ditty, dum, dum, dum.
Can you hear me play my drum.
Dum-ditty, dum-ditty, dum, dum, dum.
Beating my drum is so much fun!

Action Chant: Tapping on the Drum (spoken)
Rum pum pum, tapping on the drum
Rum pum pum, tapping on the drum
Tapping very slowly, slowly, slowly.
Tapping very quickly, quickly, quickly.
Rum pum pum, tapping on the drum
Rum pum pum, tapping on the drum
And the drummer says stop!

Action Song: Roll, Roll, Roll the Ball
(tune: Row, Row, Row Your Boat)
Roll, roll, roll the ball
Roll the ball to me
Then I’ll roll it back again
Quickly as can be.

Goodbye Song: Wave Hi, Wave Low
I think it’s time, we’ve gotta go
Wave your elbows, wave your toes
Wave your tongue, wave your nose
Wave your knees, wave your lips
Blow me a kiss with your fingertips
Wave your chin, wave one eye
Wave a hand and say “goodbye!”

Early Literacy Tip:
Seeing patterns and trying to recognize things that are alike and things that are different is a fun game for children. These activities help them develop the mathematical concepts of patterns and relationships. (modified from : The Early Literacy Kit: A Handbook and Tip Cards by Betsy Diament-Cohen and Saroj Nadkarni Ghoting, 2010)

Photo credit: The Red Henslj.com