Summer, 2017: Two Teen Successes

As mentioned in my previous post, I’m assessing the 2017 summer program in bits and pieces as time allows. Here are a couple of successes to share.

Teen Scratch Ticket Challenge

We connected with a wide variety of teens this summer with the help of scratch tickets, of all things. The idea is borrowed from the genius, Kat at the 5 Min Librarian. In May, I read her post about the Scratch Ticket Challenge and thought it was a great idea. (Read her post to find out the tech details. I followed her lead and used her template with little variation.) Using the tickets was a last minute addition, but her description seemed easy enough to pull off in my small library as a pilot and I was looking for something new to spice up the teen summer reading/learning experience. (I’ll post more about the passive challenges we also had success with soon.) Ultimately the goal is to encourage teens to keep reading all summer and if a method other than the traditional “keep track of reading” works, why not try it?

We offered every teen who checked out a book or audiobook in the physical library a scratch ticket (1 ticket per day, maximum) which either got them a prize from the candy drawer, the surprise prize drawer or no prize in which case their ticket was entered into the grand prize drawing at the end of the summer. It was easy to keep track of the number of tickets printed for statistical purposes and my coworkers found it easy to manage. They loved giving out the tickets to unsuspecting teens!

Not only did we connect with teens who don’t want to keep track of their reading (in a digital or paper log) yet still read all summer and checked out books from the library, we also caught the attention of teens who are not regularly represented in program attendance; for example, teens who live remotely and visit the library sporadically or those who have limited family support. Our teen participation went from 24 last year to 83 this year. Most of the increase was thanks to teens who were not registered for the reading challenge. The teens who loved the scratch ticket game the most were on the younger end, 12-14. Why? My guess, after looking at the names of these kids, is because they recently graduated from the kids’ reading challenge and like the idea of participating in a game type program. I also saw lots of names I had never seen in any library program ever. Some teens participated both in the game and in the official reading challenge so they were entered into the 2 grand prize drawings multiple times.

What I like about this scratch ticket idea is that it meets teens who are reading where they, or at least some of they, are- at the circ desk checking books out. Teens were pleasantly surprised so to be offered a scratch ticket! Next year we plan to continue some version of the scratch ticket game; using it to both “reward” regular users and attract more teens to the library.

DIY Virtual Reality Goggles

Teen making DIY VR Goggles

Our DIY Virtual Reality Goggles program for teens was another successful teen program, but not in the usual stats sort of way. On a spreadsheet, it might not seem like a win compared with other programs I host. It was one of those programs that required a decent amount of planning time and didn’t see significant numbers. It’s beauty lay in the conversation that unfurled during the 2 hour program, in the confidence that filled the teen makers and in the new interests the project sparked.

Imagine 4 teenage boys crafting and chatting about a variety of topics for two hours and you’ll get an idea of what happened. (The cardboard goggles require measuring, cutting and gluing cardboard from shoeboxes or pizza boxes, plus fitting lens and other materials.) Yes, we talked about Virtual Reality, we briefly tested out the goggles at the end and I gave them a list of VR apps (see below) to try at home, but mostly they wanted to “hang out, mess around and geek out” (HOMAGO), as they say.  Eryn, the teen mentor who has helped me for the last two years with everything from the maker club to storytime, and I were amazed.

If you have teenagers and you drive them in a car much, you can imagine the kind of conversation that rolled out over the two hours. When teens are in the right space with the right group and at the right time, they talk about everything in such an uninhibited way. There was nothing shocking revealed, just a group of boys, plus Eryn and I, tinkering and talking. The kids who didn’t know each other, verbally danced around topics until they found common ground. When one didn’t know what the other was talking about, the group filled him in. Eryn and I were enveloped into the conversations without hesitation.

After two hours, we eventually had to “kick them out”  and finish cleaning up. For most of the four, the goggles they made were considered a prototype and the templates they took home will be used to make the next, more polished pair. This was a program that capitalized on the allure of new media, got teens making and learning, provided access to a new technology and connected teens with each other. Win. Win.

The funniest quote? “We’re actually going to make VR goggles? I thought we were just going to watch a video about them.”

DIY VR Goggle template and cardboard laid out on table

Materials (planned for 8-10, plus 2 extras):
lightweight cardboard (from shoe boxes or pizza boxes)
2-3 X-acto knives, used at a “precision” station to avoid sharp tools being lost amongst the cardboard remains
metal rulers to help make folds clean
scissors capable of cutting cardboard, enough for each teen to have a pair
glue stick and white glue
45mm focal length biconvex plastic lenses (see template link below for details)
velcro
rubber band
table coverings to protect surface
*We didn’t use the copper tape button. It works just as well to use tap the phone screen with a finger. (See template instructions.)
Instructables template and instructions

And here are the VR apps I shared with the group of teens:

National Teen Library Lock-in 2014

On Friday, August 1st teens at my library participated in the National Teen Library Lock-in for the third time. It’s a night just for teens. We host the annual event to celebrate teens who are part of the summer program and to introduce new teens to the library.

This year, the highlight was the new continent-wide Minecraft event. A dozen teens played the popular game on a virtual server rented for the event with teens from twenty other libraries across the country. Time zones dictated how many teens we played with, but it was fun to play and fun to watch. Instead of seeing teens playing online games by themselves or with unknown rivals, our players coached each other, explored the Minecraft world together and were thrilled to be at the library.

After a couple of hours of Minecraft (we played at the end of the six hour timeline because of our time zone), we ate pizza and ice cream before ending the event with an hour of Minute to Win It. We didn’t submit our times and team scores to the National Lock-in contest, but teens loved it. The gaggle of teens, who strangers for the most part, were paired up randomly and, surprisingly, played as if they all already knew each other. I love that.

My favorite part of the night was building community- online and in the library. That seems more important than ever these days and libraries are natural community centers that bring all sorts of people together in a shared space.

For more about the event, check out the piece I wrote for SLJ Teen this week with my organizing partner, Jack Malked at the Chippewa River District Library.

Planning:
For this three hour event, we have teens register, which is unusual for our library but necessary. We also have parents complete a permission form since it is an after hours event.

To prepare for the Minecraft play, my coworker loaded the Minecraft launcher on to our public computers. We also purchased six Minecraft accounts from MinecraftEDU so teens without Minecraft accounts could also play- most teens used our accounts. We’ll be providing access to the library Minecraft accounts during regular library hours also.

The Lock-in wiki is always full of craft and game ideas so we grabbed some of the Minute to Win It games and had most of the items on hand. We also brought out our DIY Craft boxes during the Minecraft play so teens who needed a break could do origami or make a duct tape project.

We ordered pizza and bought ice cream and drinks at minimal cost.

We awarded the teen summer program grand prizes at the event and had some smaller prizes and books to give teens who played to Minute to Win It.