Summer@HPL 2016

Our summer learning program, Summer@HPL, began on May 23rd and I have been busy putting into action a robust schedule of events for kids, teens, and their families. At the same I’ve been collaborating with a fabulous coworker, @hollyfromhomer, to get the Homer version of the Great Reading Adventure up and running. We’re piloting the digital platform for other libraries in the state of Alaska. More on that soon.

It’s been a busy Spring!

Summer@HPL headerOur program, based on the Collaborative Summer Library Program‘s theme of On Your Mark, Get Set… Read!, is focusing on the concept of “healthy minds, healthy bodies” and runs from the Monday after school gets out until the end of July. Many families spend the few weeks in August before school starts traveling, so I schedule our program during the first 10 weeks of summer vacation. It works well for us and keeps the library hopping, especially when summer reading families are combined with the many summer visitors and seasonal workers who base out of Homer (for commercial fishing, etc.) and use the library regularly.

Here are the programs I have planned for kids and teens. There is mix of inside/outside and high tech/low tech events to keep families active and engaged with the library, the community, and each other. The blend involves lots of opportunities to learn, create, and share, reflecting the needs and interests of local families.

A note on adults- My library does offer a year round reading challenge for adults that we will continue to market during the summer, but I haven’t planned any specific events for adults this year beyond the occasional author readings sponsored by the Friends. With limited resources, I had to decide where to focus what I’ve got. I’m concentrating efforts on intentional, whole family engagement at many of our kid events. I was inspired by the conversations I’ve been having with library and research friends across the country as part of the Libraries for the 21st Century: It’s A Family Thing learning community (sponsored by PLA and the Harvard Family Research Project).

EXPLORE Family Storytimes (weekly): In the summer I expand the preschool storytimes’ targeted audience and include 6 & 7 year olds. I do this for a couple of reasons. Siblings are more likely to tag along and feel included with this age range so families will return each week. We also don’t have the capacity to have a lot of separate programs for each age group and this helps include these kids in a very conspicuous way- they feel included.

We include traditional elements in the storytime and several activity stations instead of the one or two art and craft projects we offer in the Winter. These storytimes are advertised as STEAM-injected and many families respond to the STEM connection. The STEAM elements might include open-ended art projects, pint-sized engineering problems, using apps and other digital tech, and of course developmentally appropriate math (counting, patterns, and computational thinking).

In June we’ll be reading and playing with themes that include: bodies (humans, monsters and other animals), re-engineered fairy tales, simple machines, travel, and play.

Small Fry Toddler/Baby Storytimes (weekly): This is a 20-30 minute storytime for ages 2 and under and their caregivers. It is a program we offer year round, but we include it in the schedule events to help connect families with babies and toddlers in the library-wide effort. Check out some of my toddler/baby storytimes for a complete details.

Victoria Jamieson is on her way to Homer (and then Anchorage) as I write for a fun visit! We’re excited to have an amazing author/illustrator come to town, a rarity in Homer. She’ll do a program for younger kids around her book Olympig! (Dial Books, 2012), a timely tale that works well with the summer theme and the 2016 Olympic Games. In the afternoon, Victoria will lead a comic workshop for kids and teens ages 10-15. We have lots of Roller Girl (Dial Books, 2015) fans in Homer, even without a roller derby team.

Summer Maker Camp (weekly): Maker programs have been an annual summer feature for four years. We don’t have the physical space for a permanent makerspace, so we integrate a pop-up makerspace once a week and include the maker concept in many of our other other programs. We were able to expand on this popular summer series during the school year thanks to an ALSC Curiosity Creates grant and kids 8-15 are excited to hang out again. We’ll meet every Thursday starting later this month.

We’re focusing on game design (digital and board) in June and video in July to give everyone time to work on their projects instead of focusing on a new tool or skill each week. We had a chance to better understand how these young makers wanted to work over the school year and we think this will be a good fit.

To kick off the June maker sessions we’ll be Skyping with two different game designers so we can talk about what makes a great game and how games are made. We’ll chat with Brian Alspach of E-Line Media (one of the creators of Never Alone, a beautiful digital game made in partnership with Alaskan elders) and Jens Peter de Pedro of Little Frogs (a founding team member of Toca Boca and leader in the world of kids’ interactive media). I love connecting mentors and our community of young makers! Skype is our friend!

Yoga for Kids (series): We are teaming up with a local yoga instructor to offer a series of four one hour classes for 5-8 year olds. This ties in nicely with our program theme. many of our programs and events don’t require any registration, but this one does because of space.

Dog Jog (with the Kachemak Bay Running Club): We’ve teamed up with the local running club for an all ages 5K beach run during a particularly low tide. They club’s volunteers are adding a 1 mile route for Summer@HPL families to walk or run. Any families who participate will get a secret code to redeem in the reading log for a digital badge, one of many kids, teens, and adults can earn this summer. (Other secret codes are available at library programs and at city parks around town.)

Stone Soup Puppet Show: The Krambambuli Puppet Theatre will present a show and string puppet family workshop for ages 3-10. Our families love puppet shows, so we’re excited to offer not one, but two, puppet shows this summer and get kids making from a young age!

Teen Read What You Want Graphic Novel Book Club: Back for a second summer, this book club is casual! Teens ages 12-17 meet me at the library to talk about what they’re reading over pizza. The group isn’t huge, but it’s a good way to hang out and talk about books, movies and anything else on our minds.

Country Fried Puppet-Palooka: Our second puppet show will be presented by the zany puppeteers and storytellers at Mcmazing Tales who are visiting Alaska again this summer. The family show will be silly and Alaskans will recognize the puppet designs from the Moose: the Movie, created by Tundra Comics maker Chad Carpenter.

Movies: We’ll offer three movie showings at the library this summer. One for younger kids and their families and two for teens.

Scientific Illustration for Kids: National Geographic Kids author/illustrator Hannah Bonner will be visiting a friend in town and offered to be part of a program for kids ages 8-13 who love to draw and/or who are fascinated by dinosaurs and prehistoric life.

Roustabout Circus: An active summer has to include the circus! The Roustabout Circus duo is visiting Homer and making a stop at the library to entertain local families. Their shows and workshops are always a hit!

Pool Party: Instead of pool passes, this year were hosting a pool party for ages 11 and under (and their adults) at the community pool inside the local high school. Kids are SO excited for this event! Swim club kids even asked if I could make a special swim challenge at the event. We’ll have to give out tickets for this event, but we’ll include a lot of families.

Minecraft Challenge: We’ll be playing Minecraft with teens at the Chippewa River District Library! The four hour challenge is always exciting, and also a bit dramatic. This event brings a lot of kids and teens to the library that we rarely see at other summer program events.

2016 LEGO Contest: We are sponsoring the 6th annual LEGO contest this summer for kids and teens. We regularly get 50+ entries which we display at the library or a week. Local judges choose winners in three age categories and the public votes on a people’s choice winner.

Ice Cream Celebration: We conclude our summer program for kids with a big celebration that includes carnival type games, ice cream, and prize drawings. 

Family: Simple Machines

This summer, which seems far away now, I hosted a simple machines storytime for ages 3-7. It was a learning opportunity for both me and those who attended so I thought I’d share it.

While most children will eventually get an introduction to simple machines in our local schools, I decided to introduce the concept at the library to the summer storytime crowd. During a recent Sound & Music Storytime when we explored electricity I realized that many of the storytime aged kids could begin to understand the basics of seemingly advanced concepts. With an introduction, they could use the foundation to then explore the concepts more in-depth later on, either at home or in school.

These kinds of programs give kids lots of hands-on experiences they may not have at home and they offer great opportunities for strengthening vocabulary, one of the early literacy skills children will need when they are ready to learn to read. This storytime  engaged kids who may not be as interested in the usual art activities, but want the opportunity to observe and test theories and ideas.

I did quite a bit of research for this storytime so I would be able to answer as many questions as possible during the program. To have a background in simple machines, I consulted several books in my library’s collection and then found my way to two books designed for educators including Science is Simple by Peggy Ashbrook (Gryphon House, 2003) and Explore Simple Machines! by Anita Yasuda (Nomad Press, 2011). Three websites were also particularly helpful: the Simple STEM wiki, Science for Kids- Simple Machines and Kindergarten Nana’s blog.

I knew this storytime would seem a bit abstract at first for kids and some adults so I took time to clearly explain and talk about what we would be doing. I created slides in the Keynote presentation app on my iPad to show kids what I was referring to as I described the different simple machines and their purposes. The slides included examples of pulleys, levers, wedges, wheels, and inclines. I also brought in physical examples of some of the smaller machines, for example a door wedge, a metal pulley, a hammer, chopsticks, etc., to go along with the images in the slides. i made sure to let everyone know they would have time to experiment with the machines later on.

We also talked about what a machine is and why engineers and designers create them (to make tasks and jobs easier or possible).  That basic concept was the premise for the rest of the program and kids really got it.

It was storytime after all, so we read together. I chose two books that are popular storytime reads at our library and feature simple machines.

Books:
Tap Tap, Bang Bang by Emma Garcia (Boxer Books, 2010)
This book highlights the use for a variety of tools and offers the opportunity for young readers to guess what the tools are being used to build. Many of the tool names were new vocabulary words for some storytime kids.

Tap Tap Bang Bang by Emma Garcia Image Credit: awesomestorytime.wordpress.com

Tap Tap Bang Bang by Emma Garcia Image Credit: awesomestorytime.wordpress.com

Rattletrap Car by Phyllis Root (Candlewick Press, 2001)
This story features an engaging tale of a family trying to get to the lake in an old car that keeps breaking down. The family each come up with creative substitutions for the parts of the car that fail, including a beach ball for a wheel. The book includes a repeated verse that has lots of fun sounds and words to play with as I read it aloud.

Rattletrap Car Image Credit: hootsnhollars.blogspot.com

Rattletrap Car by Phyllis Root Image Credit: hootsnhollars.blogspot.com

Activities:

The next part of storytime featured a series of stations that I had staged before storytime. This part was a little tricky in our library because storytime happens in the children’s library not in a separate storytime room and kids are sitting or walking through as they enter the activity/craft area. Fortunately, the families are patient and waited a couple of minutes as I pulled out some hidden stations and then explained each of them. Because adults don’t always hear every instruction, I added signs and brief written instructions at each station so I and the teen volunteer could move around the room and would not need to stay at one station.

Pulley

I attached a small pulley to one of the “trees” in the room. I first asked kids to try to lift a bucket full of glue bottles with one or both hands above their heads. I then asked kids to try and lift the bucket over their head again using the rope threaded through a pulley (rope was attached to the bucket at the other end).

Pulley Station

Pulley was hung from tree.

Incline

This set up took some creativity, but offered lots of play. Again I asked the kids to try and lift the tub of books up the top of the toy bin. It was too heavy so then kids pulled the tub of books up the incline. They also pushed it back down and then climbed up and down the ramp.Kids could have done this for hours and several adults were heading home to build an incline of their own after storytime.

To make the incline, I brought in an old piece of plywood I had at home and leaned it up against on of the library’s toy bin. I brought a plastic tub from my office and filled it with various picture books.

Incline Station

Kids pulled box up the incline.

Wheels

I got creative at this station and used our rhythm sticks as wheels to show kids what was possible. I took another tub of books and asked the kids to try and push the box across a space with just their bodies. The tub was heavy and awkward so then they tried to move it on top of the rhythm sticks. When the time came, I showed them how to move sticks fromt he back and put then under the front to keep the tub moving.

Wheels Station 1

Wheels Station 2

Kids used the rhythm sticks as wheels to roll the heavy box from one place to the other.

Lever

I found some scraps of wood at home to make a rustic seesaw, a kind of lever. I built the basic seesaw and left miscellaneous blocks in a pile nearby so kids could make each side balance. The best part of the program was when the little girl pictured wanted to use a cardboard box as a fulcrum and made it work! Very cool!

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Kids balanced weight on each side of the lever.

Lever Station 2

Screws

Because we have a limited space and there were so many stations this week, I had coloring sheets of screws and other simple machines on the tables for kids to work on if they were waiting for another station or just wanted a different experience. Screws are actually simply inclined planes wrapped around a core, so I chose to skip that machine when planning the hands-on stations.

Apps: Summer Favorites

As promised, here are some of my new favorite apps that tie in nicely with our summer reading program this year. I have another list of iOS favorites you might want to check out here. You should also check out Little eLit Pinterest app boards or Digital Storytime for more ideas. To find out how I evaluate apps and new media for use with kids, read more about my criteria.

Know of any apps that should go on this list? Let me know!

4-8 years

Story Apps
Alphabet of Insects
Red in Bed (and Google Play)
So Many Stars-Andy Warhol
Barefoot World Atlas
Jr. Astronaut-Breaking Through the Space Barrier
The Mud Monster
Finn’s Paper Hat

Toy Apps
Toca Town (also Google Play and Kindle)
Pettson’s Inventions
Plants by Tinybop
How it Works: Machines by Geek Kids
Laurie Berkner’s Sing and Send
MOMA Art Lab

8+
FIFA World Cup (also Google Play It is soccer season after all! Kids, teens and adults can track stats, learn about players, and follow specific teams/countries.)
Minecraft Pocket Edition (also Google Play)
Monster Physics
Barefoot World Atlas
Tynker- Learn Programming With Visual Code Blocks
The Elements: A Visual Exploration
Jr. Astronaut- Breaking Through the Space Barrier

Preschool: My Body

This week was a busy one at our library! We celebrated National Take Your Child to the Library day on February 1st with a LEGOs at the Library program, hosted a tech lab for 8-12 year olds on Digital Learning Day, added an additional preschool storytime at the library (bringing the in-house count to three) and offered a family storytime at a community fire hall as part of our two month Storytime on the Go outreach program. I got the chance to interact with a lot of community members and share library resources with lots of kids and their families!

This week’s storytimes were all about My Body. I began the preschool and outreach programs with a book instead of a song because this book is so engaging and fun to look at.

Ain't Gonna Paint No MoreBook: Ain’t Gonna Paint No More by Karen Beaumont and David Catrow (Harcourt, 2005)

Ain’t Gonna Paint no More is about a boy who loves to paint anything, much to his mother’s dismay, and gets messy while doing it. The words could be sung, but the images are to be savored so reading the text is my preferred mode. I love that kids can anticipate the next body part to be painted by the rhyme that comes before it. Catrow’s illustrations are colorful and exciting, providing for lots of conversation. My favorite page features a painted arm with small black ants all in a row. We find out that the source of those ants is a mouth painted on the boy’s hand featured on the next page.

After talking about our basic body parts it was time to talk about what’s under our skin. I brought out the book, My Body (DK Children, 1991), part of the What’s Inside? series. The first chapter includes one picture of a fully clothed boy on one side and then a picture on the right of the boy’s photo peeled up revealing a skeleton underneath. It’s an easy way for kids to appreciate the connection between their bodies and bones and begin a discussion about bones. 

fablevision_digital_learning_day_2014_bannerIn honor of Digital Learning Day, I brought my iPad to storytime again! Digital media, like apps, give me and the caregivers in attendance more teaching tools and different ways to engage kids. Using an app like this one in storytime, lets parents learn about new high quality apps they could try at home and let’s me model how to use apps with kids. I strongly support joint media engagement and encourage families to use apps together. When I include digital media in storytime, I use it along with many other familiar tools so kids see there is a time for digital media and a time for books, toys, songs, and the like.

App: This is My Body (urbn;pockets, 2014)my body app This is my Body is one of two iPad apps I looked at for use during this storytime. The other app called The Human Body (Tinybop, 2013) is a more complex app with high quality images, incredible detail, and an interesting Q&A feature, but I felt that This is my Body offered the basic features I needed for a quick activity in a preschool-friendly package. I chose to focus on the skeleton with this app and introduce it by talking about the skeleton as a puzzle.

I started by showing families the starting page and what is included in the app. Then I tapped on the skeleton section, revealing a completed skeleton with a place to tap for the activity page. Select bones are skittered around the outline of a body and with a tap and a drag a bone can be slid to the right location. If the bone is slid to the right spot, it will stick. If not, it will slide back to the area outside of the body. Kids took turns tapping and dragging different bones to the proper location in the body outline.

Using the app in the storytime setting didn’t work quite how I expected, but I would try it again. Here’s what we struggled with: Even with its smaller number of bones, the page still had some bones that kids, particularly the younger ones, weren’t sure where to place. After the larger, more recognizable bones were dropped into the right spot, kids weren’t quite sure what to do. This put kids, especially the younger ones, on the spot as we huddled around the iPad. This may work better mirrored on a big screen so kids don’t feel the need to crowd the iPad making each other feel rushed to figure out the right location for the bone. If I used the app again, I would drag and drop more of the harder to recognize bones (not just one) as I demonstrate how to play the bone game.

I provided an information sheet on a healthy media diet and how to find quality digital media for kids so parents had information to take home.

Action Song: Are you Ready for a Story
If you’re ready for a story, shake and wiggle!
If you’re ready for a story, shake and wiggle!
If you’re ready for a story, If you’re ready for a story,
If you’re ready for a story, shake and wiggle!
… sit down please (with penny whistle)

stand tall mlm

Book: Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon by Patty Lovell and  David Catrow (G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 2001)

Molly Lou’s body is unique, like everyone’s. Catrow’s illustrations celebrate Molly Lou’s beauty and strengthen the book’s message. This is a colorful, fun to read story celebrating our individuality, the love of family, and friendship. A nice read aloud for toddlers, preschoolers, and early elementary.

Action Song: Hands are for Clapping by Jim Gill (1993) via Sound Cloud

This song got us moving and using specific parts of our bodies as Gill sang. I played the song using my phone, the Sound Cloud app, and a portable speaker. I connected the phone and speaker using an auxiliary cord so the two would stay connected. (Previously, I’ve had the bluetooth connection disconnect between the time when I set up for storytime and when I actually wanted to play the song.)

partsBook: Parts by Tedd Arnold (Dial Books for Young Readers, 1997)

Unlike the other books we read, Parts features a boy who is scared of his own body! He worries about bellybutton fuzz, hairs in his comb, loose teeth and ear wax. Thankfully his parents finally get him sorted out. At one storytime, the kids and I decided this boy, who we named George, should come to storytime to learn a few things about his body!

We ended with this fun action song. We started slowly and then repeated the song multiple times, going faster and faster.

Song: Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes (using multiple tempos)
(Sing to the tune of London Bridge is Falling Down)
(Have child mimic you and place hands on the appropriate parts of the body.)
Head, shoulders, knees & toes, knees & toes,
Head, shoulders, knees & toes, knees & toes,
Eyes and ears, mouth & nose,
Head, shoulders, knees & toes, knees & toes.

Activities:

IMG_1614Potatohead Station

Potatoheads are a fun, hands-on way for kids to learn the basics about body parts. I borrowed this set of potatoheads from a local teacher who is a close friend. Before storytime I made sure all of the potatoheads were blank so kids could build the characters however they wanted to. This also gave caregivers a chance to talk about the body parts as kids added them and what goes where. Some kids added parts in imaginative ways and others placed each part with anatomical accuracy. This set of 7 large and small potatoheads worked for well as a station for storytime groups of 7-40 in combination with the second station.

Life-size self-portrait

Life Sized Self-portrait

I brought a roll of butcher paper from home for this activity. Along with our boxes of markers and crayons that regularly sit at each table during storytime, the paper was the only material needed. The butcher paper was just wide enough for preschool size kids.

Caregivers had their child lay on top of the precut sheet of paper while they traced the outline of the child’s body. This often resulted in giggling because outlining a preschooler or toddler’s body often leads to unintended tickling!

Once the outline was complete, kids and caregivers went about coloring in body parts and clothes making each one unique.

Photo credits:
Parts: Eva’s Book Addiction
Stand Tall, Molly Lou MelonThe Illustrated Book Image Collective
This is my BodyUrbn; Pockets
Ain’t Gonna Paint No More: Amazon

Preschool: Tigers

This is the easiest preschool storytime I have even put together! The books are all fabulous and the kids loved the program. This storytime incorporated science, math, and early literacy skills, with the art of story supported by beautiful illustrations.

new sit mats

As families arrived, kids picked out one of our new sit mats for themselves and then joined me for singing and movement guided by our Rhyme Cube. I love these new mats which were paid for with an early literacy grant from the Alaska State Library!

big catsBook: Everything Big Cats (National Geographic, 2011)

I used this non-fiction title to introduce the storytime theme, Tigers. We spent several minutes looking at high quality photographs of tigers and talking about what a tiger looks like, what distinguishes a tiger from other big cats like lions, where tigers live, and what they eat.

Action Song: Five Little Monkeys Sitting in a Tree (with sign language)
Five little monkeys swinging in a tree
Teasing Mister Tiger “can’t catch me!”
Along came the tiger, slowly as can be
And…POUNCE! (hands with fingers extended away from your body like claws)
Four little monkeys….. (last verse is done with signs only)
Now there are no little monkeys swinging in a tree
(three, two, one…)
Song Credit: Perry Public Library

The sign language version of this song was modified from Marge Loch-Wouters‘ crocodile version of the Five Little Monkeys song.

To see images of the tiger-related signs go to: (tiger) Life Print and (roar) Handspeak

Action Song: Are you Ready for a Story
If you’re ready for a story, clap your hands
If you’re ready for a story, clap your hands
If you’re ready for a story, If you’re ready for a story,
If you’re ready for a story, clap your hands.
… sit down please (with penny whistle)

When I sing the second verse with the penny whistle, I play down the scale when I ask them to sit down and play up the scale to have them stand back up. The kids quickly associate the change in sound with the appropriate action.

mr.-tiger-jacket-from-FB-pageBook: Mr. Tiger Goes Wild by Peter Brown (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, 2013)

A well-paced story about being yourself, this story is a great read-aloud. Mr. Tiger, frustrated with the normalcy offered by the tame city life he knows, discovers his wild side and learns to be himself. His friends who once promoted the sterile, domesticated lifestyle Mr. Tiger rebels against, accept his individuality and even reveal their own. The illustrations compliment the simple text creating a tale suited for storytimes about tigers, individuality, and friends. (Also available as an E-book.)

Book: Oh, No! written by Candace Fleming and illustrated by Eric Oh No!Rohmann (Schwartz & Wade, 2012)

Another fabulous book by Fleming, Oh No! offers kids the opportunity to predict the story’s elements, repeat the story’s refrain (Oh no!) and imagine their own ending. The tale is one about a deep hole in the jungle and all of the animals who fall into it, one at a time, trying to rescue the animals who have already fallen in. The climax of the story occurs when tiger comes to “help,” only to be bumped into the hole by the earth-shaking steps of an elephant who rescues all of the other animals at the same time. Just when the story appears to be over, a turn of the last page reveals the tiger’s paws appearing out of the hole on the inside back cover. It provided a great opportunity to ask kids “what happened to the tiger?” (Also available as an E-book.)

Action Chant: Down In The Jungle
(clap hands on knees and clap them together
to set the rhythm of the chant.)
Down in the jungle with the beat in your feet, Think of an animal that you’d like to meet. That you’d like to meet!
(have child name a jungle animal)
A tiger, A tiger , I want to see a tiger! ROAR!
Song Credit: Perry Public Library

tinylittleflytigerBook: Tiny Little Fly by Michael Rosen and Kevin Waldron (Candlewick Press, 2010)

Rosen’s gift for writing picture books is demonstrated, yet again, in this story about a sly little fly that is able to escape the swatting of a tiger, the rolling mass of a hippo, and the tramping of an elephant. This is a fun story to read aloud because of the sound words, repeated text, and accompanying illustrations.

Along with the other books I read today, Tiny Little Fly‘s artwork is noteworthy. Waldron’s illustrations are sophisticated but child friendly. The nature-inspired hues on an off-white background provide a good context for the story. Waldron adds to Rosen’s story with the placement of the animals throughout the book. The book design includes a partial view of each animal as the story progresses which invites kids to interact by guessing what animal comes next in the sequence.

Activities:

Tigers provide a subtle way to talk about patterns which was the focus of the craft/activity portion of this storytime. Drawing attention to something as simple as the orange and black pattern of a tiger helps kids recognize patterns, important for both language and math literacy.

IMG_1602

Storytime and the following activity, both take place in our children’s library. Before each storytime, I set up the large table seen here with all of the materials kids and their caregivers will need for the activity.  This week, I put small signs and labels by the needed materials to make it easy to choose the materials for the two activities I provided today. The signs also demonstrate to parents one way to create a text-rich environment for their kids.

Creating a tiger mask was the first activity. Before this week’s storytime, I cut out the center of each of the paper plates and hot glued the plates on to wooden craft sticks. I also prepped some of the materials they used to decorate the masks, as noted below. Today kids used the supplies to assemble the mask.

IMG_1601

Tiger Mask

Materials (for each mask):

  • paper plate (with center cut out)
  • large
  • craft stick (one end hot glued to bottom of paper plate to serves as mask handle)
  • one black strip approx. 8 1/2″ x 2″ (kids cut into eight pieces to create striped pattern on mask)
  • one orange strip approx. 8 1/2″ x 2″ (kids cut into eight pieces to create striped pattern on mask)
  • 2 circles cut from white paper
  • 2 googly eyes
  • black paper for whiskers and ears (cut by kids and parents)
  • white paper for teeth (cut by kids and parents)
  • glue
  • scissors

IMG_1605

The second activity was a simple pattern project. Kids, particularly the younger ones, ripped strips of black paper and glued them on the orange paper to create a pattern.

Materials (for each pattern project):

  • 1 orange piece of orange construction paper
  • piece of black construction paper approx. 4″ x 10″
  • glue

Image credits:
Everything Big Cats Geo Librarian
Mr Tiger Goes Wild Peter Brown
Oh No! Amazon
Tiny Little Fly Michael Rosen