Little Makers

Just about a year ago, my library closed the building because of the COVID-19 pandemic. To commemorate the unprecedented time, here is the story of a program I codesigned with a colleague at a local early childhood organization to support families in our community from a distance. There have been a lot of tears, frustration, and even anger during the last year, but this program has been a triumph. It represents the many community partnerships I’ve been part of in the past year – with both organizations and individuals – and reflects the library’s place in a web of organizations and institutions that support families.

The virtual Little Makers program for 3-6 year olds premiered in the Fall of 2020 as an experiment and we will be hosting our third iteration of it, Little Makers Spring Edition, in the coming weeks. Families were and are eager for learning experiences hosted by our two organizations and we are happy to connect with families.

Our shared goals for the program:

  • support early learning
  • introduce key media literacy and computational thinking concepts and skills
  • foster family engagement
  • maintain and even grow families’ relationship with the library and the community partner

Platform

Zoom was the obvious choice for our needs, especially considering our weather here in Alaska between September and May. When we launched the idea of a virtual Little Makers on Zoom, enough time had passed during the hunker down period that many families were well-versed in using Zoom, or at least familiar with the idea of using videoconferencing for everyday meetups. Families joined with laptops, tablets and cell phones.

Little Makers Materials Kit

Materials

Before the series of meetups began, registered families picked up a kit of materials funded by our Friends group and other Foundation support. I applied what I had learned from my summer experiment with Activity to Go! kits and included almost everything a family would need for the program – supplies and supporting information – organized and labeled for each of the four weeks. We didn’t assume families had glue sticks, for example. This way families could pull out a bag just before each week and be ready to go. For example, one week in the Winter session, we read Big Bed for Little Snow by Grace Lin. We then made a comfortable bed for Little Snow- one that wouldn’t burst – from materials including a paper plate, white and blue tissue paper, a coffee filter, pom poms, feathers, tape, and a tape measure. Some kids decided the bed was for a stuffy they had at home and found the tape measure especially useful for making sure the bed was the right size.

Information about how to make the virtual experience a successful learning experience was included in the supporting information, as well as details about the books we would share and prompts for making. (The image above shows what materials were included in each families’ kit for the Winter session). In the event that a family missed a week, or needed to leave early for whatever reason, families could make at home with the information and supplies provided.

Making a bed that won’t burst for Little Snow

Timeline

The routine for each of the four meetups in each session looked very similar so kids and families knew what to expect. We met for 30 min each week which was just the right amount of time. Kids were engaged and excited for the next week.

Welcome (2-3 minutes): We provided tech reminders as families entered the meetup from the waiting room including “Change your screen name to your child(ren)’s name” so we can call kids by name and “Before Claudia begins reading, we’ll ask you to mute your audio so everyone can concentrate on the story.” (This reduced at least some of the distractions we all experience.)

We also made time for hellos, calling kids by name and introduced ourselves to make sure everyone knew our names.

Opening song (1 minute): “If You’re Ready for a Story” (This is the same song I sing on my weekly Radio Storytime program.)

Story (10-12 minutes): Each week I read one picture book and included one early learning, computational thinking or media literacy tip for grownups. As I read, I asked questions that kids could answer with a thumbs up, a nod or head shake, or a smile. These questions took into consideration the Zoom platform and the need to have audio muted for this portion of the program, but encourage engagement. I also asked questions with slightly longer pauses than you might expect, leaving space for caregivers to repeat the question at home and discuss with their little makers or siblings could talk about together. This was done in a way that didn’t disrupt the flow of the story.

Note on reading stories on Zoom: During the first meetup, I tried sharing a story using an iPad as a document camera connected separately to the meetup. For those on a mobile device, it was hard for them to see both my face and the book pages. With all of the different device types, different comfort levels with Zoom, and some people having updated versions of Zoom and some not, it worked more smoothly to share the book on my computer only with the pages close up to the camera while I read the text and then moving my face into the view when I was asking questions about the story, observing the illustrations, etc.

Making time (10-12 minutes): This part of the program was similar to the second half of preschool storytime in the library before the pandemic. The activity aims to help the little makers explore ideas in the book we shared, practice vocabulary that might be new to them as they play with the materials, and express their creativity. We invited grownups to turn on their video if it was off, change their Zoom view to gallery and turn on audio so we could all see and talk with each other for the remainder of the program. We then invited little makers to open their bag of materials as we announced the week’s creative prompt. The prompt presented a “problem” and families used the provided materials to make something that helped solve that problem. One week it was a bed for Little Snow. During a later week we used ingredients similar to those found in the book Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story by Kevin Noble Maillard and Juana Martinez-Neal to make edible, no-bake playdough. Some of the materials from one week’s bag could be incorporated into another week’s making. This models repurposing and encourages creativity in problem solving.

Regardless of the activity, we encouraged families to incorporate materials they had at home into the project. To get their creative juices flowing from the start, we played games like a color scavenger hunt in the first meetup (find something yellow like the colors of both Claudia and Red’s sweaters) or bring a stuffy to storytime today (and then make a fort or den for them in the activity portion of the meetup).

We also made sure to notice when families were doing something a little different and asked what they were up to and helped make connections to our activity if applicable. For example, while some of us were making fort prototypes with craft supplies after reading The Little Red Fort by Brenda Maier and Sonia Sanchez, one family made a fort out of couch cushions. The whole group talked about the fort as the family gave us a video tour and then we discussed where else we could build a fort – in the snow! We asked questions that encouraged the makers to tell us the fort’s story.

We anticipated that families would continue making beyond the time together on Zoom. We invited families to post pictures of their projects on a Padlet. Families could connect with each other and with us through the posts on the program specific Padlet. We talked about the images during the following meetup. These photos were not shared on social media and the program was not recorded.

Closing (2-3 minutes): At the end of the meetup, we invited little makers to share and talk about what they were creating and what they might do next.

General Thoughts

We slowed down the pace of reading, asking questions and talking with families. What might be a normal pace for adults talking with others on Zoom or how we might talk in person, isn’t the same in this type of program. We keep in mind that families had different internet connection speeds which cause delays in what they see and hear, kids need a little time to get used to what they were seeing on the screen and young children often process and respond to information more slowly than adults.

We talk about the technology, the parts of the book, and the maker materials so that kids learn the names of things and what they can do. This is an important part of media literacy.

Fifteen families have registered for each session we’ve offered, the maximum we set. Within each session there has been lots of variation in terms of who registered and almost all registered families have participated in every week. The number of families is determined by the funds we have for materials and a good size for the Zoom meetup. This group size allows us to have conversations with individual families within the allotted time.

We encouraged caregivers to play alongside their children and most households had a child or children attend alongside a grownup. But not in every case. And in some households, the caregiver never appeared in the screen. The prompts we designed took into consideration that an adult might not be right there.

It was very helpful to have two people on hand to share the facilitation roles and the tech troubleshooting, even if we were partners codesigning a program. While I am sharing the book, my partner was answering questions, welcoming families form the Zoom waiting room if they were late and noticing if something was amiss. While she was introducing the maker activity, I was doing the same.

When we read Bee-Bim Bop! by Linda Sue Park in the first session, the families “programmed” the Claudia robot to make Bee Bim Bop with the felt pieces in the kit as my partner retold the story.

Two Lessons We Live by in This Program

  • If something isn’t working as well as we’d hoped, we change it.
  • We keep it as simple as we can while being creative.

Radio Storytime

After the Associated Press published a story about my Radio Storytime, I’ve had several librarians ask me what it looks like. After 6 weeks of hosting the program on KBBI AM 890, our public radio station, I’ve found something that works for my community and is low impact on radio station staff who welcomed me into their system.

And to any publishers reading this,

Thank you for helping me provide storytime. Families (and grownups without kids) love and need it. The calls from kids, videos of at-home dance breaks between stories, and emails all tell the program’s success.

Please extend your gracious read aloud permissions at least through the summer. Families are going to be stuck when school, and the formal support of teachers, pauses for the year. Remote library programs like storytimes, whether via radio, internet, and even phone, will be a bright spot in all this chaotic darkness.

Please also specifically include audio, not just virtual video, storytimes in your permissions. Live storytimes led by librarians on public radio stations have the ability to reach library families with limited or no internet access. The digital divide is getting WWWIIIIDDDDDDEEEEERRRR and young children need the early literacy support and community connection storytime can offer NOW MORE THAN EVER.

Storytime

I’m going to be honest here. This weekly, hour long family storytime takes me several hours to prepare. As many of you are experiencing, tasks I used to be able to do with little effort are now taking more time, new tools and skills, and a whole lot of learning. I’m not even cutting out felt pieces or prepping art supplies! For me its worth it, but it’s not a program I can take lightly.

Remember: kids can’t see you!

What I need to prep each week:

  • 3 engaging books whose text carries the story without the help of images and, when read aloud, last about 7-10 minutes. (Consider publishers’ read aloud permissions and fair use as it applies to storytime during the COVID-19 pandemic.)
  • Questions or prompts to get the audience thinking about each story. (Think dialogic reading without the actual response.)
  • 6-7 recorded songs, with times, for the movement breaks in-between stories, the beginning and end of the program, and for filler if books are shorter than expected or not many kids call-in. (I can play recorded music because of the radio’s license.)
  • Transitions for between all segments to set up the story or introduce specific actions for the movement breaks.
  • Prompts to engage kids during the call-in portion (talking on the radio is strange, even if kids recognize my voice).
  • Library updates.

Remember: the fundamentals of an engaging storytime translate to radio. You’ve got this!

The Key Parts of Radio Storytime
I try to script out what I am going to say much more than I would for an in-person storytime. My time slot is one hour and the program has to start and end at a specific time. I can’t start late or go over. I make sure the combination of books and music can fill about 40-50 minutes. No audience to make conversation with takes getting used to so I practice books, transitions, etc. a lot more than I would face to face.

Opening Music (changes every week), 2-3 minutes 

Intro: Welcome the audience. Say hello to radio station staff if they are on air with you. Thank the station. Introduce the storytime plan and if there is a theme. I keep it real by talking about how I am feeling or what’s going on that week in the community weather or health wise. (Channel Ella Jenkins or Fred Rogers.)

If You’re Ready for a Story (unknown)
If You’re Ready for a Story bend (to touch your toes) and stretch (like a sea star).
If You’re Ready for a Story bend and stretch.
If You’re Ready for a Story, If You’re Ready for a Story,
If You’re Ready for a Story, bend and stretch. 
(Note about singing on the radio: I am not a good singer. This is the only “song” I sing. Kids know it from storytime so I keep going for it. I prefer to to leave all of the other singing to the recorded artists.)

Transition: Let’s read! Find a comfortable spot where you can hear the radio. Snuggle up with a grown up, a brother or sister, a stuffy or even your pet. I love to read with my dog. 

Book 1: Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes (thanked the publisher, HarperCollins)
Chrysanthemum is the tale of a girl mouse who feels perfect in every way until she faces ridicule for her unusual name. Can you say Chrysanthemum? Do you know what a chrysanthemum is? 

Transition: Yesterday’s rain made me think about our first dance break song. The ants in this song are marching to a beat made with all sorts of percussion. Can you find something to be a drum? Maybe a pot from the kitchen and a wooden spoon? Or your clap your hands together? I like to slap my hands on the tops of my legs to keep this beat as a march dance around. If there are a few of you at home, march and play your impromptu instruments in a line around the house. Don’t forget to march squatting low to the ground like the ants do! The singers will tell you when.

Dance Break: “The Ants Go Marching” by Rhythm Child (3:30) 

Book 2: The New Small Person by Lauren Child (Candlewick Press)
This is Elmore’s story. He is an only child who finds himself with a new small person in the house. And he doesn’t like it. Or does he? 

Transition: That was a long story so let’s do the hokey pokey! Grab anyone at home and form a circle or pretend you’re with us in the station. We’re going to dance with different parts of our body called out by the singers in this blues version of a classic.

Dance Break: “Hokey Pokey” by Mr. Eric & Mr. Michael (2:23) 

Book 3: Pout-Pout Fish by Deborah Diesen and Dan Hanna (Farrar Strauss Giroux) This is a very popular book about a fish who is so sad and frowns all the time. His sea friends do all they can to turn that frown upside down into a smile. Get ready for some fun rhyming words!I am reading this book on an iPad and I checked it from the Alaska Digital Library with my library card. 

Transition: While we get ready for the call in part of the show, it’s time for some twisting! This is a new, acoustic version of an old song that involves twisting your body. To do the twist you turn your hips one direction while at the same time turning your shoulders in the opposite direction. 

Dance Break: “Twist and Shout” by Rob Newhouse (2:20)

Call in: What’s your name and Where are you calling from?what do you see out your window right now? 

Library Updates: If you want to remember the book titles I shared today you can visit the library’s website and look for the Radio Storytime page. You can find the song titles there also or check out the HPL Storytime on KBBI playlist on Spotify.

Extra music: “Freestyle Groove #1” by Rhythm Child (3:06), “Jamboree” by The Okee Dokee Brothers (2:24)  

Closing Song: “Goodbye, Goodbye” by Joanie Leeds (2:00)

Miscellaneous notes:

  • I am the only children’s services librarian at my library. I lead storytime, am planning the summer program, manage collection development for kids and teens (physical and digital) and other duties as assigned. I’m comfortable trying something new with a learning curve and multiple iterations, like this.
  • My program airs at 10am on Thursdays, similar to one of the in-library storytimes I typically offer. I physically go to the station right now, but I will do the program from home, if need be. I m in the station with one other staff person. (I live only a short driving distance from the station and we take the necessary health precautions while I am there.)
  • This program is only available live. It is not recorded for future listening.
  • Right now is a great time to collaborate with library staff, community partners, etc. for many reasons; in case you get sick, to share resources, reach more families, etc. We have had a good relationship with the radio station for a long time, so we jumped at the chance to join forces for storytime.
  • The radio station needs the book and song information for their records (radio license.) I email it to them before every storytime. I also post the same information on the library’s Radio Storytime webpage and on the Spotify playlist (songs). Families have asked for the info ahead of time so they can follow along with the paper book if they have it at home.
  • The station can give me stats on live-streaming, but not information on how many people are listening to the show on radio. Consider how you will determine storytime is a success. How will your library, and the radio station, measure the program’s impact?

ALSC has a forthcoming guide to virtual storytimes which has some of my general considerations for audio only storytimes. The sections are being release one at a time and should be available in its entirety soon.

What questions do you have? Post them in the comments and I’ll add to this post as needed.

Molly of Denali!

Source: AK Public Media

I’m always looking for media, in all formats, that authentically reflects Alaskan families’ experiences. Today, a new show produced by WGBH in Boston for PBS Kids does that and more. I’m excited about the show and the advanced screening we offered at the library earlier this summer was a great learning experience. Here’s why.

The show

Molly of Denali, like other PBS Kids shows for young children, is an animated, entertaining show that supports early learning; in this case the idea of informational text. The producers define informational text as “any text created for the main purpose of providing information. Informational text can be created using written words, oral language, visuals, or a combination of these forms.” (PBS Kids) Examples include recipes, signs, maps, websites, text messages, podcasts, songs and more. Informational text is all around us and provides another entry point for supporting early literacy, but it is rarely given so much attention in early childhood entertainment.

The show also aims to address cultural representation and it does this well. The story, ways of knowing, and setting details are authentic. Each episode also features a live action piece featuring Alaskan kids sharing about well, Alaskan life. How does a producer in Boston, get that right? She had help. From the script writers, voice actors, and song writers to the cultural advisors, Alaska Natives were involved in the production and the result is what I dreamed of when I was working on the Diverse and Inclusive Checklist with KIDMAP. (Watch out, Pamyua‘s theme song is catchy and you’ll be singing it all day long!) The show is silly, entertaining, enriching and even serious at times.

Listen to a story about the making of Molly of Denali on Alaska Public Media here.

The Event

While Molly of Denali is set in a fictional town, Qyah, kids from all over rural Alaska can see themselves reflected in the show. But no, this isn’t just a show for Alaskan kids. (Let’s face it, that would not be an easy sell for a producer.) Kids from elsewhere can relate too! Families will connect with the characters and learn much about what it is like to be a kid in rural Alaska. Molly Mabray is a young Athabaskan who is adventurous, strong, curious and kind. What a great role model for all kids!

We were excited to be one of several Alaskan communities to host an advanced screening of the show. We wanted to bring families together at the library to celebrate what the show and its creators had accomplished. It was also a great media mentorship opportunity. I knew we could model how to practice Joint Media Engagement, or Co-viewing, while watching a tv show together, introduce tips on evaluating media and talk about how quality tv can support early learning.

I started the afternoon family event by quoting from Dr. Rudine Sims Bishop’s piece “Mirrors, Windows and Sliding Glass Doors”; introducing many grownups to her name, words and ideas. I have wanted to do this for a long time and Molly of Denali offered great examples of all three for families in my community. It also gave use a foundation for talking about the show during the event (in between the two episodes we watched). Dr. Bishop’s idea is not strictly a book-related concept, but applies to all media and we can use it to evaluate media in the library and at home.

I then introduced the show and some of the characters, talked about what informational text is and why it is important to talk about, and shared some of the backstory and why it is a landmark creation. The intro was not too long, just several minutes, but planted a seed that got grown-ups thinking. The questions I got after the program- about recommendations, the show’s creators, when the show would air, etc. – were evidence.

We showed two episodes (animated portions only), with a short conversation and popcorn break in between. The in-between episodes chat was prompted by questions like “What did you recognize in that episode?” (high tunnels for growing food, mountains, trees dirt roads, traditions, rivers, the library, the kids and more), “What is different about Homer (where we live) and Molly’s community of Qyah?” (no ocean, no boats, the language, the stores) and “How did Molly and her friends learn about canoeing?” (YouTube, the coach, practice) Many kids enthusiastically chimed in with their observations.

Afterwards I mentioned that families who enjoy podcasts might like to add Molly of Denali to their listening list. Several families asked me how to access podcast episodes and if I could recommend others. Alaska is big and even casual road trips are long. Podcasts are a perfect fit for the Alaskan family!

About 65 people showed up for the program held in our children’s library. After the screening families stayed in the library to chat with each other, do some of the activity sheets connected to the show, and look for books. (I made sure a display of Alaskan picture books was prominent.) The event was simple, but meaningful.

I hope you enjoy the show!

CT and Early Literacy Activities: Making Music

Activity: Making Music with Makey Makeys

Ages: 4+

Materials/Equipment: Laptop computer (1/station), Makes Makey (1/station), 4 pieces of Play-doh, different colors (1 set/station), internet access for digital piano

CT Skill: Decomposition is the CT skill that involves breaking larger actions into smaller, easily completed steps. We do this when we sing and clap words to break then down into syllables.

In a music storytime, among other books, I shared I Got the Rhythm by Connie Schofield-Morrison and Frank Morrison which follows a young girl and her mother on a walk around their community. On the mini-adventure, the girl creates individual moves that become a dance accompanied by the music created by neighbors.

Afterwards, families visited stations that included: music-making with Makey Makeys, building rubberband kazoos or egg shakers, instrument exploration and mixing music with the app Loopimal on one of the library’s mounted iPads.

At the Makey Makey station, the computer was connected to the pieces of Play-doh with several wires, each going to a different clump of clay, via the Makey Makey. Young musicians touched a clump of Play-doh with one hand and held the “ground” with the other, creating an electrical circuit, and then a corresponding note was played on the digital piano. Once they figured out which Play-doh piece made which sound they created songs to their liking. (The Makey Makey tricks the computer into thinking the Play-doh clumps are keys and creates an electrical circuit. So if the Play-doh, which is conductive, is pressed or tapped, something happens on the screen. In this case a key on the digital piano is played.)

Both the book and making music with a Makey Makey exemplify breaking down (decomposing) music and dance into its components, but they also demonstrate how to build something back up, songs or dances, using other CT skills like pattern recognition and algorithm design.

Want to learn more about CT for you children? Paula Langsam and I will be talking more about the CT and early literacy connection at ALA Midwinter in Seattle.

Media Literacy for Young Children: Accuracy Matters

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Emperor Penguin by Christopher Michel via Flickr

Many people have no idea how much discussion and debate children’s librarians have about topics like books, programming, library organization, awards, digital media use, inclusion/diversity, holidays and more. We are a passionate, caring bunch! Even in my small, rural library we analyze, critique, and evaluate the merits and missteps of kids media on a daily basis.

Recently, our in-house discussions have focused on media that reflects the Alaskan/Arctic experience. Finding any content that includes Arctic animals, cultures, landscapes, etc. can be hard. When we do come across media with Arctic references, we pay special attention.

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Walrus by USGS via Flickr

Three titles, two picture books and one app, came across my desk late in 2016 that made me let out a deep sigh; Penguin Problems by Jory John and Lane Smith, Little Penguins by Cynthia Rylant and Christian Robinson, and LumiKids Snow by Lumos Labs. (See more info below.) At first glance they had nothing to do with the Arctic, but then…

Why does some children’s media continue to feature, incorrectly, penguins living in the Arctic and walruses in Antarctica?

What’s the big deal, you ask? Accuracy.

I am calling attention to the penguin/walrus issue here because I think it represents the broader accuracy/authenticity issue that is sometimes pushed aside as minor because the media is otherwise high quality. Some might say I am exaggerating or being overly sensitive. Should I overlook penguin/walrus issue?

While I am a true fan of the fantastical, fictional, and imagined, I do think that kids and their families learn a lot about the real world in fictional media. In all media for kids, books, apps, etc., I think accuracy matters. Incorrectly associating penguins and walruses may seem like a silly example of accuracy issues, but authentic representation supports kids by allowing them to see themselves, their environment, and their culture in the media they read, watch, and explore. All types of media also feed all types of kids’ curiosity about other people, places, and times. Inaccuracy- stereotypes and misinformation- can have lasting effects. I know writers, illustrators, designers, and developers can create high quality experiences that entertain, challenge, represent, and teach.

Interestingly, the Annoyed Librarian posted about scientific accuracy in children’s picture books on the Library Journal blog (November, 2016). While there are several comments to consider on the blog site, check out the additional conversation over on the Storytime Underground Facebook page. Whether or not Eric Carle’s caterpillar makes a chrysalis or a cocoon may not seem connected to the current discussions about fake news, but it might be. Kids and their families take away information from all reading experiences.

As media mentors, it is important for librarians to help families think about what the book, app, video, and website is telling us and whether or not the content is factual (and accurate), fantastical, or a hybrid. Media literacy is not new to librarians and this aspect of our work continues to be fundamental across formats. Intentionally including critical thinking skills in programs for even the youngest patron and conversations with families will have a long term impact. These skills will be invaluable as young children become adult readers and expand their media consumption. I and several others talked to Linda Jacobson about this for her article, “The Smell Test: Educators can counter fake news with information literacy. Here’s how,” in the January issue of School Library Journal.

The examples:

Problem: Walrus in the Antarctic?
A walrus appears late in the story clearly about Antarctica and told by a penguin. There is no explanation why and how the walrus appears in a marine world filled with otherwise authentic Antarctic animals. Was this a mistake or did I not get a joke in the otherwise humorous story?

penguin problems

Penguin Problems by Jory John and Lane Smith

 

Problem: Walruses and Penguins?
Again a walrus appears in this book about penguins, but in this case the walrus is a subtle addition to a book not as clearly about Antarctica, except for the presence of penguins. The generic types of animals, other than penguins and walruses, can be found in both regions. Maybe the penguins have immigrated? Maybe the walrus did?

little penguins.jpg Material Life

Little Penguins by Cynthia Rylant and Christian Robinson

 

I read both books with preschoolers on different occasions and asked kids to help me decide. I asked the two different storytime groups to help me find the issues. One or two kids were able to recognize that walruses (native to Alaska and the Arctic) and penguins (native to the Antarctic and Southern Hemisphere) do not coexist. That was ok- we all learn something everyday. They liked the books for the most part, but were a bit puzzled why the walruses were there given that all of the other animals were appropriately connected. Even the adults had the “huh!” expression on their faces.

With information literacy on my mind, I then used the books as starting points for media literacy conversations. We briefly discussed whether the book was  a pretend story or a real story (pretend- penguins don’t talk or live in igloos, they were sure) and tried to figure out if the authors and illustrators added the walruses as a joke (not sure). We also used nonfiction titles and images on my iPad to help us take stock of where the other animals in the books live in real life (all in Antarctica except for the walrus, they were sure) and to decipher if the illustrations looked like northern Alaska and the Arctic or Antarctica (not sure- both regions can be snowy, icy, and have water).

Problem: Penguins in the Arctic?

lumikids snow

LumiKids Snow, Early Learning Play for Kids by Lumos Labs

 

App Description (iTunes, 3/10/17): “Explore an arctic adventure in LumiKids Snow! In this frozen playground, meet new LumiKids friends while you toss snowballs and sled around then warm up with some cozy s’mores!”

The app I reviewed for inclusion on my library’s mounted iPad, but I will not be adding it until the description is updated. (I contacted the developer in early January).