#StayingHome: Library Life and the Pandemic

How are you?

It’s been almost three weeks since our library closed to the public and two since I, and most of my coworkers, started working from home. It seems like a lifetime, I won’t lie. We’ve all been thrown for a loop.

It’s hard to keep ourselves safe, take care of our families, wonder about unemployment, and think about supporting our communities, an integral part of public library work; all at the same time.

COVID-19 cases are just starting to pop up in Alaska, but sadly three Alaskans have already died as a result of the virus (as of 3/27/20). With a statewide population of about 737,500, and only 1,500 general hospital beds, keeping the number of people who get ill low is essential. Local and state officials continue to issue more restrictive health mandates as they use the latest research and data to prevent widespread sickness. My rural community, like many across the country, is served by a small hospital with limited resources to treat large groups of sick people. Fingers crossed that social distancing and these mandates will successfully limit the local effects of the pandemic. My heart goes out to those of you in communities that have been dealing with widespread illness and death already.

NOT Business As Usual

Since the library closure, first for a week and then until further notice, four of my coworkers have been recruited to work with the City’s Emergency Operations Center. For now they are helping with public information, IT, research and safety recommendations. The rest of us are identifying priorities and long term strategies for supporting our community outside of the library building.

We are not circulating any physical library materials right now in order to discourage groups of people gathering at the library and limit the sharing of materials that might carry the coronavirus. The library building, and what’s inside, are an important space for so many in Homer. Shutting down for an unknown period of time has made us look hard at key services we offer and how we can continue to be supportive in the near future; even without a building. It also makes us worry about our neighbors with no internet access, no home and no community.

During the last couple of weeks I’ve paused to a- get a handle on how long we are going to be closed (still uncertain, but for awhile), b- finish up reports and other paperwork and c-think intentionally about how to support families going forward. What does my community need and can I offer? My library, my community, my knowledge and my resources are not the same as yours might be. Let’s all do our best and get through this, ok?

My priorities include:

Connect – Maintain, and even strengthen, relationships with families and individuals in a time of social distancing. How do we help families connect with the library’s resources, make more high quality digital resources available, and use our resources to create conversation with youth and families? How do we help families (some for the first time) access basic services like food and shelter?

Learn – Schools are closed here at least until May 1. The school year in Homer ends on May 20 normally, so I don’t anticipate kids going back to school. Many teachers are working beyond overtime to provide engaging activities for kids and teens. How can we compliment what the schools are doing to support youth and families? What learning gaps can the library fill? Which learning experiences can we amplify (Mo Willems’ daily drawing sessions, or the WideOPENSchool, for example)? What services, like storytime, can we continue at a distance and what new opportunities can we create? What can we learn from each other and other libraries?

Collaborate – Our community of about 12,000 (including the service area) includes many organizations that support its overall health and vibrancy. As we find our footing, how can we continue to develop the strong partnerships and practice social distancing? How can we work with libraries around the state to share good ideas and be more effective?

Inform – The library and my coworkers are working hard to share accurate information about COVID-19 and its local impact. What does that mean in a community with varied access to the Internet and an unending amount of news and information, what I refer to as “noise”?

Advocate – Especially in times of hardship, what does advocacy look like? When we are having trouble focusing on anything beyond our own difficult reality, how do we look outwards? Do we buy food or other items from local businesses, donate to a regional food pantry, or speak up about national issues like digital inequity when learning is completely online? (My answer is yes to all of the above, if you can.)

These goals are not new, but how we meet them now just looks a bit different. Since we are trying out new kinds of programs and adding new resources or services with less staff, we are adding slowly and intentionally. It’s a marathon they say. I’ve never run a marathon, but I get the idea.

This is media mentorship on a grand scale. As usual, there are a lot more questions than answers.

Programming

Many librarians have taken their storytime, a foundational program in many libraries, to Facebook or YouTube. I agree that programs like storytime provide families social and emotional support in addition to learning experiences. So, I got to thinking. My singing voice was not meant for the internet so I decided to go old school.

With broadband access spotty in my community, I needed a way to provide equitable access to early literacy and the storytime experience. Instead of live video, I am partnering with our local public radio station, KBBI AM 890, to bring storytime to the air waves that reach far and wide here in Homer. Those with internet can stream the program and those without can tune in on the good old radio, still a key public service in rural Alaska.

One radio staff person and I will be in the station during the program, unless the situation changes and I have to start recording from home. I have an hour, so I’ll share some stories geared for a broad audience, create dance breaks between stories with recorded music from some of my favorite artists, and then chat with kids during a call-in at the end of the program. I love experiments and trying new things, so fingers crossed!

To prepare, I have been reading through books I either grabbed on my way out of the library before we closed, had in my home library, or are available on our digital library. The books I will share are not necessarily the ones I typically read in storytime at the library. Context matters! The stories won’t have the pictures to amplify the story’s ideas, so the text will be the star of the show.

Thankfully publishers have been generous with their permissions for educators and librarians to share a wide array of books during read alouds right now. Many of them are very supportive of the virtual storytimes happening across the Internet, so I contacted a few to clarify that my experience was included. (They said yes!)

The library’s StoryWalk is back (early)! Each month, a new picture book will grace the library’s walking trail. Families can practice social distancing while they support literacy and enjoy outdoor activity. (The pages are posted at least 6 feet apart because of the trail’s design.)

We’re working on other programming to replace the learning experiences that we typically offered kids after school and adults using, you guessed it, Zoom, and other platforms. An ASL Club, a coding club, a literary meet up and more are in the works. We’re figuring out how to keep stats, which audiences we will target when, etc. Summer programming, pandemic style, is still in the brain dump stage though. (You should see my bullet journal. It’s a mess.) More on that soon.

Library’s Digital Resources

Ebooks, digital audiobooks, games, digital magazines are in hot demand now. The plethora of free content is also at an all time high. In order to make the library’s digital resources more visible and highlight, or curate, some of the high quality digital learning platforms that are temporarily free and the virtual read alouds and art activities hosted by children’s media creators, I have been given editing powers for the youth sections of my library’s website. I’ll continue to write social media posts on behalf of the library about youth media, but the website editing is a new task for me.

I’ve spent the last few days adding content, slightly reorganizing the content and making it clearer how to access new resources, especially those with temporary access, while we’re closed. We’ve set up methods for getting a library card virtually, made it easy to reach staff at home, updated the event calendar, added more than 100 titles/copies for kids to the digital library (the entire juvenile fiction budget for 2020), shared key links with educators and families, and more. This doesn’t even include the official COVID-19 information being added almost daily by my coworkers.

What if…

In the midst of all this, as a staff we have also needed to be wise about succession planning. What happens if a staff member is sick or needs to care for a family member or worse? Who takes over their projects or tasks? How does one person know the status of a project or task that needs to be done? For starters, we articulated actual succession plans, particularly for the director and those responsible for particular departments, before we left the library. We’ve also instituted daily Zoom staff meetings (Monday – Friday) and turned to Basecamp to keep us organized. We’ve always planned for an earthquake or tsunami, not a pandemic, so we are all being creative, intentional (there is that word again), and articulate about what’s next. It’s a team effort.

With all the in-person conferences and workshops in the near future canceled, I’ve been adding a few virtual projects and meetups to my calendar. I look forward to learning from and collaborating with new colleagues. We’re all in this together. What’s in store for you and your library?

#stayhome

Storytelling, Writing and Computational Thinking

Happy New Year!

2019 was a busy year. I found myself knee-deep in new ideas, exciting projects, the day-to-day of working with kids and their families at the library. As I look back, one of my favorite threads winding through all of it, was digital storytelling and making opportunities for kids and their families to write their own stories using a variety of media, including digital.

Digital Storytelling for Young Children & Their Grownups

In the Spring, five families with children ages 6-8 spent a Saturday morning at the library practicing early computational thinking* skills while creating stories together with ScratchJr. The relaxed and conversation-rich program provided an opportunity for young children and their grownups to learn basic coding together. After a brief introduction to what CT is and how to use the pre-reader friendly, block programming in ScratchJr, each family worked on one computer, co-designing characters, selecting backdrops, experimenting, writing brief dialogue, and animating their short narratives. The low pressure program introduced kids and adults to a new kind of learning media and revealed the expanding array of tools and kinds of learning experiences families can use to support their children’s literacy skills. Families continue to craft stories using ScratchJr. at home or on the library’s iPad digital learning station.

Based on the success of this program, in 2020 I will be offering a 6-week series on computational thinking for preschoolers and their families.

ScratchJr. on the library’s iPad Digital Learning Station. The station includes two headsets and two seats to encourage Joint Media Engagement and ScratchJr. tip cards to help new digital storytellers get started.

From Scratch Coding Camp

This past summer, I lead a 5-day digital storytelling camp for a dozen kids ages 9-12 with the help of Karmen, a community member. Inspired by CS First‘s coding curriculum and Scratch, we gave these authors, illustrators, directors, playwrights, programmers, and voice actors the tools they needed to create animated stories that were funny, complex, and completely unique. We had so much fun creating and learning together. Kids played with story design, character development, dialogue, and genre. The low pressure setting aloud them to apply what they knew about writing, in new ways, to stories that were personally meaningful. They brainstormed, discussed their ideas, storyboarded, explored the technical features of Scratch that would help them animate their stories, and experimented. Mistakes happened, kids got stuck, Karmen and I had to change activity plans daily, but we each applied computational thinking skills and dispositions to the process and found success!

As part of planning, Karmen and I created a paper storyboarding tool (on the right) to help campers plan and organize their stories in Scratch. A paper iteration of different scenes we included in our collaborative demo story is found on the left.

My favorite part of the camp was the successful collaboration displayed in a variety of ways. Collaborating happened side-by-side – one story created by two kids working together over the 5 days on a single computer, by multiple kids on separate computers expanding and altering stories in stages using Scratch’s remixing feature, and as part of real time revisions kids helped Karmen and I make to the story we created for demo purposes and expanded over the length of the camp. On the last day, each creator confidently presented their story to an audience of campers and families who asked thoughtful questions about their process.

Problem solving

FanFic for Teens

While I was working with this younger storytellers, a coworker was meeting with older aspiring FanFic writers who were using computational thinking to crafting new iterations of popular stories they love like the Harry Potter stories. This slightly more traditional writing program incorporated some of the same computational thinking skills – decomposition, algorithm design, pattens recognition – as digital storytelling.

Programming Projected Animations

In October, I attended the Connected Learning Summit in Irvine, CA and one of the personal highlights of the conference was getting the chance to play, in a learning kind of way, with other librarians and educators. The Scratch team co-led a “Playful Projections and Programming‘ session that invited us to create interactive animations using Scratch. It was refreshing to team up and design something just for fun. We weren’t figuring out a lesson plan for a program or class. We were just learning.

While I didn’t go to the session with a library program in mind, I immediately integrated the idea into a regular maker program I host. With a couple of projectors, a few computers, paper, a whiteboard, tape and some markers, kids programmed animations that filled the walls of our meeting room and invited curious onlookers to stop in.

One group expanded and modified the animations I originally created as a demo for the day’s activity (the underwater scene above made with digital fish and paper seaweed) and others worked on brand new animations, including the one below of a basketball player shooting hoops over a unicorn. (The basketball player and ball are digital, the hoop is drawn on a whiteboard and the unicorn is digital enhanced with markers on the whiteboard.)

While this program used coding in Scratch, I never taught coding formally to these kids. I presented the problem – to create an animation using both digital and physical parts – and gave them the tools to solve the problem. Some worked on their own while others worked in pairs. Kids identified what they were trying to do and others, myself or other kids, helped them figure out how to accomplish their goal.

CSEd Week Community Partnership

There are still few opportunities for kids of all ages in our community to dive deep into programming as part of their developing literacy skills. Several of us are developing partnerships to expand the kinds of learning experiences where kids and families can try programming as a tool for self-expression. The most recent one came about during CSEd Week in December. I teamed up with a local elementary school librarian and two of her fellow teachers to introduce digital storytelling to 4th and 5th graders using CS First’s Everyday Hero coding curriculum. The three part project involved brainstorming as a class about what makes a hero, traditional writing activities in class, and animating their heroes while learning some basic coding concepts using Scratch with me.

I lead 5th graders at West Homer Elementary through basic Scratch tasks as they learn how to animate the everyday hero they wrote about in class.

One of the goals of this project included increasing access to both computational thinking and basic coding skills for kids and educators. I also wanted kids who had gained some coding experience at the library to see how coding might be used in other parts of their life, in this case school, and have new avenues for creating reflective, relevant stories. The project was brief, but it was a successful first step towards future partnerships.

A teen near-peer mentor supports two 4th graders creating a program to animate a digital version of the everyday hero they wrote about in class.

In fact, the pilot project has led to a next iteration planned for Spring 2020. We are currently co-designing a combined oral and digital storytelling unit that will take place over multiple days and allow for more exposure to coding with Scratch and computational thinking skills.

*Find out more about computational thinking by searching this site with the computational thinking tag. A team of us are also coauthoring a white paper with the PLA Family Engagement Task Force in 2020 about computational thinking with young children and their families at the library. Sign up for my blog mailing list to hear about the paper release.

Guest Post: Libraries Connecting to Nature

For the first time, Never Shushed is featuring a guest post! Please welcome Gay Mohrbacher from WGBH, the creators of valuable digital content that supports literacy and learning for children and their families.

Libraries are active participants in the ongoing movement to get families outside and connected with nature. Many house regional natural history collections; others host kids nature clubs, offer community garden registries, loan outdoor equipment, or develop collections on sustainability themes. They also offer families programming and information about resources for outdoor learning.

A free resource that librarians and families can both use to actively explore nature comes from the PBS KIDS multimedia project, Plum Landing. The website, designed for children ages 6 to 9, stars a plum-shaped alien and her human friends who teach kids about the biodiversity of different ecosystems through games and short animated and live-action videos, but also gets them outside to investigate and experience, and then publicly share documentation from their local surroundings. 

For librarians, there are educational resources for settings like afterschool or week-long vacation programs. The free curriculum provides collections of hands-on science activities paired with media—animations, videos, games, photo apps, and more—arranged in thematic sequence and aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards.  

In an activity called Seed Spot! children learn how plants spread seeds to give their offspring the space and resources to grow. To start, kids can watch a 2.5-minute animated video about wearing fuzzy socks outdoors to collect seeds on the ground—then they head outdoors on a scavenger hunt for different kinds of plants and seeds. There are extension ideas and an online game called Seed Racer to continue the learning about how seeds are dispersed.

Librarians can:

  • Choose from a collection of children’s activities designed to support outdoor exploration. Activities range from 10 to 40 minutes long, are low cost/low prep, and can be led by any informal educator, no matter their educational background. There are short animated videos to introduce the activity, or you can skip the video and dive right in. 
  • Use the Educator Tip videos to learn tried-and-true best practices in leading outdoor science exploration. The videos are hosted by Jessie Scott, a longtime outdoor educator with the U.S. Forest Service.
  • Print out and offer any of the self-guided activities for families to do themselves—these are available in English and Spanish. For example, you could encourage families to try the Build a Watershed activity in which kids and parents build a very simple model of a landscape to see how water droplets flow and how the shape of the land helps collect water.
  • Introduce the free Outdoor Family Fun with Plum App, (available for iOS, Android, and Amazon devices), which helps families build a habit of nature exploration. Whenever they open the app, families receive new “missions” asking them to find, count, photograph, and talk about things like birds, clouds, bugs, or shadows. Each mission includes a call to action, a tool for the mission (like a counter), and tips. To encourage parents to use the app on a repeated basis, new missions and achievements unlock as families progress. In all, there are 150+ unique missions to explore the local environment.

Kids who spend time exploring outdoors feel more connected to plants and animals and come to better understand the need to take care of the planet. Research shows that regularly doing outdoor activities boosts mental and physical health. Plum Landing’s kid-tested activities make it fun and easy to explore outdoors—with very little prep and no expensive materials. Visit Plum Landing online to begin your explorations: pbskids.org/plumlanding

About the author:

Gay Mohrbacher coordinates educational outreach for the children’s environmental science initiative, PLUM LANDING, produced by WGBH, Boston’s PBS station. WGBH is recognized as a national leader in producing media-based resources to support learning and teaching. A top priority is serving under-resourced children and working with national partners and local communities to overcome barriers to educational success. 

New Professional Books!

Are you a children’s or teen librarian looking for some new books to add to your professional collection? I am lucky enough to be part of three book projects that I highly recommend! All are published this Spring or Summer and range in scope from the everyday guide to the academic reference. These are resources rich with content contributed by researchers and practitioners who are experts in literacy of all kinds. Enjoy!

Create, Innovate and Serve: A Radical Approach to Children’s & Youth Programming

Edited by Kathleen Campana and J. Elizabeth Mills

Published by ALA (March, 2019)

60 Ready-to-Use Coding Projects

Edited by Ellyssa Kroski

Published by ALA (April, 2019)

International Encyclopedia of Media Literacy

Edited by Renee Hobbs and Paul Mihailidis

Published by Wiley (June, 2019)

CT and Early Literacy Activities: Making Music

Activity: Making Music with Makey Makeys

Ages: 4+

Materials/Equipment: Laptop computer (1/station), Makes Makey (1/station), 4 pieces of Play-doh, different colors (1 set/station), internet access for digital piano

CT Skill: Decomposition is the CT skill that involves breaking larger actions into smaller, easily completed steps. We do this when we sing and clap words to break then down into syllables.

In a music storytime, among other books, I shared I Got the Rhythm by Connie Schofield-Morrison and Frank Morrison which follows a young girl and her mother on a walk around their community. On the mini-adventure, the girl creates individual moves that become a dance accompanied by the music created by neighbors.

Afterwards, families visited stations that included: music-making with Makey Makeys, building rubberband kazoos or egg shakers, instrument exploration and mixing music with the app Loopimal on one of the library’s mounted iPads.

At the Makey Makey station, the computer was connected to the pieces of Play-doh with several wires, each going to a different clump of clay, via the Makey Makey. Young musicians touched a clump of Play-doh with one hand and held the “ground” with the other, creating an electrical circuit, and then a corresponding note was played on the digital piano. Once they figured out which Play-doh piece made which sound they created songs to their liking. (The Makey Makey tricks the computer into thinking the Play-doh clumps are keys and creates an electrical circuit. So if the Play-doh, which is conductive, is pressed or tapped, something happens on the screen. In this case a key on the digital piano is played.)

Both the book and making music with a Makey Makey exemplify breaking down (decomposing) music and dance into its components, but they also demonstrate how to build something back up, songs or dances, using other CT skills like pattern recognition and algorithm design.

Want to learn more about CT for you children? Paula Langsam and I will be talking more about the CT and early literacy connection at ALA Midwinter in Seattle.