Maker Monday: Electricity

This summer’s Maker Monday programs (for ages 8-18) have included a variety of opportunities to explore and create. During a recent Monday, a gaggle of kids and teens joined us at the library to learn about electricity and play with some new toys. After sharing the Makey Makey with preschoolers during a storytime the previous week, I wanted to include older kids in the fun. Along with the BrushBots we made, the Makey Makey offers a perfect tool for talking about electricity in a way that makes the learning process fun and relevant.

Makey Makey Set Up

Here’s how the program went:

Makey Makey

We began by talking about electricity. We shared how we use electricity and its sources. I introduced them to the tiny, but powerful, world of atoms, protons, electrons, and neutrons. Our discussion included the ideas of neutrality, balance and how energy moves. The conversation also included a static electricity experiment (rubbing balloons on our hair) and the significance of the closed circuit or loop.

Need some videos to refresh your knowledge about electricity? Check out the old School House Rocks electricity video or Bill Nye’s video. Here’s a helpful information sheet that might come in handy also.

At this point, the kids were ready to put their new knowledge to work. None of them had ever seen a Makey Makey before and they were all curious to see what it could do. I showed them this brief video to get them thinking. “How do they do that?” was my favorite comment!

We then spent about 30 minutes testing the conductivity of various items and using the tool to make music and play games as a group. I encouraged the group to throw out any ideas they might have about how the Makey Makey should work. I shared with them the recent study about preschoolers and their ability to figure out tech gadgets more easily than much older college students. The researchers found that the preschoolers didn’t have preconceived ideas of how they should work, making it easier to explore how the machine works. They openly explored what was possible. Engineers and makers often do the same thing I told the group.

As we began to try out the Makey Makey we focused on the basic set up, using just the four alligator clips that turn a banana, or purple play dough, for example, into an arrow key. All the while, I reinforced the idea of the loop or closed circuit. This was the idea I picked as a take home for the group. Here are some of things we tested with the Makey Makey.Testing Conductivity

I explained that we were going to explore the Makey Makey together and then after building BrushBots whoever wanted to play with the Makey Makey again would have time for that. We began with a set of four bananas and then started switching out individual items ending up with alligator clips connected to four different objects. The coolest part of the test was creating a closed circuit with people! We got everyone to stand in a circle, with one person holding the negative (ground) and another person holding one of the positive clips. In between the two was the rest of the group. We were able to play music when we touched hands. We got a few smiles, for sure…

The materials I used for this experiment:
a Makey Makey
computer with USB for accessing video and sites (we projected the websites on the meeting room’s large monitor)
4 bananas, pencils and paper (to test the conductivity of graphite), 4 colors of play dough, large marshmallows, plants/leaves, blocks of wood (smaller the better), aluminum foil, paper clips, each other
a variety of sites for testing the Makey Makey

After playing with the Makey Makey, most of the makers needed a break. The two hour program is long enough to really play with some of these tools and ideas, but a snack helps keep everyone exploring. It worked out perfectly.

BrushBots

We’ve had big crowds attend our Maker Monday programs and most weeks I don’t require registration. This week, I had to change that. I only budgeted for 24 brush bots so kids could take home the bot and keep exploring. I signed up 23 makers, leaving one for an example and back up if any parts broke. I explained how to make a bot and once again talked about electricity and the importance of the close circuit. The makers divided themselves into two groups and got to work at the tables where they found the bot parts. All of the parts are easy to find separately, especially if you’re making a smaller number of bots. For this program I bought two BrushBot party packs that came with stickers and were slightly cheaper than buying them another way.

Once the BrushBots were complete, it was time to race them! One of the regulars to the Maker Monday programs started designing and building the race course out of the cut paper towel tubes I brought along. Other racers quickly jumped in to help. The bots raced on the table between the cut tubes, not inside the tubes.

What we learned: Tape must be added only on the course if it doesn’t cross the track because the bots struggle over the tape. The tubes make a nice border, keeping the bots moving forward. Also, racers should have time to modify their bots during different heats. Our race was pretty informal, but the racers definitely fiddled with their designs to see if they could make it buzz down the track straighter, for example.

BrushBot race course

Materials:
24 bots (2 BrushBot Party Packs)
wire strippers
scissors
cutters
decorating materials
paper towel tubes for side rails
blue tape for finish line

After building the bots, several makers wanted to go back to the Makey Makey which was perfect. Some makers ended up racing and modifying the course, others played with their bots and the rest played tetris with a pencil drawn game controller or piano with marshmallows.
Makey Makey testing
Other librarians are using Makey Makeys also! Check out posts by Liz at Getting Giggles and Amy at The Show Me Librarian.

2 thoughts on “Maker Monday: Electricity

  1. Thanks for the great clear write-up! What fun and what a great example of letting kids discover and play/learn!

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